Author Archives: Sara Kropf

The Hoskins Prosecution Comes To An End

By Dan Portnov On Friday, November 8, 2019, Lawrence Hoskins was convicted of violating the Foreign Corrupt Practices Act.[1] The jury verdict, delivered on a Friday afternoon in Connecticut, barely made the national news (the bar has been set higher … Continue reading

Posted in Conviction After Jury Trial, FCPA, Money Laundering, Trials | Leave a comment

Why Is DOJ Trying to Unfairly Disqualify Defense Counsel for “Conflicts”?

By Sara Kropf There seems to be a disturbing trend by Department of Justice attorneys to encourage defense counsel to disqualify themselves based on a supposed “conflict of interest” without disclosing to defense counsel why the prosecutor thinks a conflict … Continue reading

Posted in DOJ policy and practice, Ethics | Leave a comment

DOJ Clarifies the Stakes for Corporate Wrongdoers

By Dan Portnov You know that it’s been a busy month in law enforcement news when a speech and memo announcement by DOJ Criminal Division Assistant Attorney General (AAG) Brian Benczkowski concerning corporate criminal penalties arrives with little fanfare. It … Continue reading

Posted in DOJ policy and practice, DOJ Statements | 3 Comments

Does the Government Have to Turn Over FBI 302s in Discovery?

By Sara Kropf The government usually turns over interview memos, or FBI 302s, during discovery in a criminal case. As I’ve written before, a 302 is a summary of a witness interview written by an FBI agent. It is in … Continue reading

Posted in Discovery/Brady, DOJ policy and practice | Leave a comment

How an OIG Investigation Becomes a Criminal Investigation

The following excerpt is from our upcoming e-book, A Guide to OIG Investigations for Federal Employees and Contractors. It’s filled with all sorts of useful information on the OIG investigations. We chose this excerpt in light of recent news about … Continue reading

Posted in OIG investigations | 1 Comment

Calling DOJ’s Bluff: Why a Stand-Alone False Statement Charge Is the Sign of the Weak Prosecution

By Sara Kropf On September 4, 2019, after just a few hours of deliberation, a jury in federal district court in Washington, DC found former White House counsel Gregory Craig not guilty of one count of making a false statement. … Continue reading

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Trial for the Terrified

By Dan Portnov I’ll make a confession: I am not a trial attorney. If you need a Johnny Cochran or Benjamin Brafman-type courtroom wizard, I’m not your guy and I never will be. Still… I love trial. I’ve done several … Continue reading

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Why Do White-Collar Criminal Defense Lawyers All Seem to Know Each Other?

By Sara Kropf When I first started doing white-collar criminal defense work as an associate at a big firm, I noticed that the partner always seemed to know the other lawyers on the case. They had been AUSAs together, or … Continue reading

Posted in Uncategorized | 1 Comment

OIG Investigations – Why Lawyers and Federal Employees Should Both Worry (Part IV)

By Dan Portnov If you’re a federal employee or individual under investigation by an Office of Inspector General, waiting for an update or some sign of progress from the OIG can be agonizing. As we’ve written before,[1] OIG policies and … Continue reading

Posted in Criminal Investigation, OIG investigations | Leave a comment

The Reach of Federal Blackmail and Extortion Statutes (Part II)

Note: This is the second part of an article that was first published in the ABA Criminal Justice magazine. By Sara Kropf In Part I of this article, we analyzed the difference between blackmail and extortion and examined the various … Continue reading

Posted in Blackmail/extortion, Travel Act | Leave a comment