Author Archives: Sara Kropf

Does the Government Have to Turn Over FBI 302s in Discovery?

By Sara Kropf The government usually turns over interview memos, or FBI 302s, during discovery in a criminal case. As I’ve written before, a 302 is a summary of a witness interview written by an FBI agent. It is in … Continue reading

Posted in Discovery/Brady, DOJ policy and practice | Leave a comment

How an OIG Investigation Becomes a Criminal Investigation

The following excerpt is from our upcoming e-book, A Guide to OIG Investigations for Federal Employees and Contractors. It’s filled with all sorts of useful information on the OIG investigations. We chose this excerpt in light of recent news about … Continue reading

Posted in OIG investigations | 1 Comment

Calling DOJ’s Bluff: Why a Stand-Alone False Statement Charge Is the Sign of the Weak Prosecution

On September 4, 2019, after just a few hours of deliberation, a jury in federal district court in Washington, DC found former White House counsel Gregory Craig not guilty of one count of making a false statement. Mr. Craig had … Continue reading

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Trial for the Terrified

By Dan Portnov I’ll make a confession: I am not a trial attorney. If you need a Johnny Cochran or Benjamin Brafman-type courtroom wizard, I’m not your guy and I never will be. Still… I love trial. I’ve done several … Continue reading

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Why Do White-Collar Criminal Defense Lawyers All Seem to Know Each Other?

By Sara Kropf When I first started doing white-collar criminal defense work as an associate at a big firm, I noticed that the partner always seemed to know the other lawyers on the case. They had been AUSAs together, or … Continue reading

Posted in Uncategorized | 1 Comment

OIG Investigations – Why Lawyers and Federal Employees Should Both Worry (Part IV)

By Dan Portnov If you’re a federal employee or individual under investigation by an Office of Inspector General, waiting for an update or some sign of progress from the OIG can be agonizing. As we’ve written before,[1] OIG policies and … Continue reading

Posted in Criminal Investigation, OIG investigations | Leave a comment

The Reach of Federal Blackmail and Extortion Statutes (Part II)

Note: This is the second part of an article that was first published in the ABA Criminal Justice magazine. By Sara Kropf In Part I of this article, we analyzed the difference between blackmail and extortion and examined the various … Continue reading

Posted in Blackmail/extortion, Travel Act | Leave a comment

Jeffrey Epstein is Dead. Now What?

By Dan Portnov (photo from USAToday.com) In perhaps the biggest news story of a slow August, Jeffrey Epstein apparently hung himself in his cell at the Metropolitan Correctional Center (MCC) in Manhattan early Saturday morning.[1] Epstein’s suicide launched multiple conspiracy … Continue reading

Posted in civil case, Congressional investigation, Criminal Investigation, Detention issues, DOJ policy and practice, OIG investigations | Leave a comment

The Reach of Federal Extortion and Blackmail Statutes (Part I)

Note: This article was first published in the ABA’s Criminal Justice magazine in Summer 2019. By Sara Kropf In early February 2019, Amazon CEO Jeff Bezos published an explosive blog post accusing the National Enquirer’s owner, American Media Inc. (AMI), … Continue reading

Posted in Blackmail/extortion, Travel Act | 1 Comment

Sweet Release: Alternatives to Incarceration

By Dan Portnov Last week convicted and newly accused sex offender Jeffrey Epstein was found injured in his cell in the Metropolitan Correctional Center (MCC), while awaiting his trial. This came shortly after his attorneys lost their bid to have … Continue reading

Posted in Bail, Pre-Trial Motions Practice, Sentencing | 1 Comment