Category Archives: DOJ policy and practice

Does the Government Have to Turn Over FBI 302s in Discovery?

By Sara Kropf The government usually turns over interview memos, or FBI 302s, during discovery in a criminal case. As I’ve written before, a 302 is a summary of a witness interview written by an FBI agent. It is in … Continue reading

Posted in Discovery/Brady, DOJ policy and practice | Leave a comment

Jeffrey Epstein is Dead. Now What?

By Dan Portnov (photo from USAToday.com) In perhaps the biggest news story of a slow August, Jeffrey Epstein apparently hung himself in his cell at the Metropolitan Correctional Center (MCC) in Manhattan early Saturday morning.[1] Epstein’s suicide launched multiple conspiracy … Continue reading

Posted in civil case, Congressional investigation, Criminal Investigation, Detention issues, DOJ policy and practice, OIG investigations | Leave a comment

Investigating the Investigators: Highlights from Recent DOJ OIG Investigations

By Dan Portnov Office of Inspector General investigations don’t always make the news. After all, no one ends up in jail or paying back billions of dollars in ill-gotten gains as a result (usually). However, one federal agency’s OIG seems … Continue reading

Posted in DOJ policy and practice, OIG investigations | 1 Comment

Should DOJ Indict President Trump But Seal the Indictment?

Given the position of the Office of Legal Counsel that a sitting president cannot be prosecuted, there has been some talk (including by me) about the possibility of indicting President Trump now but keeping the indictment under seal until he … Continue reading

Posted in DOJ policy and practice, Indictment, Speedy Trial Act, Statute of Limitations | Tagged | Leave a comment

Outsourcing DOJ Investigations?

By Dan Portnov Last week, the government moved one tiny step closer to being able to “outsource” its criminal investigations to non-DOJ actors. In a post-trial order, Southern District of New York Chief Judge Colleen McMahon excoriated the government for … Continue reading

Posted in DOJ policy and practice, internal investigation | Leave a comment

Roger Stone’s Early-Morning Arrest: Stop the Perp Walk

If you read my Twitter feed, you may know that I am a bit left of center when it comes to politics. Ok, I’m a lot left of center. But, like so many criminal defense lawyers, I don’t judge my … Continue reading

Posted in DOJ policy and practice, FBI policy and practice | Tagged | 2 Comments

Government Contractors Conducting Investigations: A New Normal?

By Dan Portnov Here in DC, government contractors are everywhere and vital to keeping nearly all federal agencies running. Absent an Edward Snowden-level scandal, the integration of contractors and their day-to-day work in government offices largely goes unnoticed (and underappreciated). … Continue reading

Posted in Criminal Investigation, DOJ policy and practice | Leave a comment

Prosecutors Sure Do Love the Perp Walk

By Sara Kropf I recently listened to Preet Bharara’s podcast on a long car ride. He’s the former United States Attorney for the Southern District of New York. After months of conducting interviews of government-side subjects—prosecutors, FBI agents and the … Continue reading

Posted in DOJ policy and practice, Insider Trading | Tagged | 1 Comment

Surviving Parallel Proceedings

  By Dan Portnov Late last week the other shoe finally dropped for Theranos founder and ex-CEO Elizabeth Holmes, as she and fellow executive Ramesh “Sunny” Balwani were indicted on charges of wire fraud and conspiracy to commit wire fraud. Following … Continue reading

Posted in Criminal Investigation, DOJ policy and practice, SEC Investigation, SEC policy and practice, Wiretaps | 1 Comment

The Department of Justice Should Drop the Inauguration Day Protest Cases

The Department of Justice has been humiliated in its misguided prosecution of over two hundred Inauguration Day protestors. It has lost every single case to go to trial. It has engaged in intentional violations of the rules. And it has … Continue reading

Posted in Acquittal After Jury Trial, Brady violations, Discovery/Brady, DOJ policy and practice, First Amendment | Tagged | 1 Comment